Isaiah Webster

Tag: Democratic Party

Bernie’s a liar. There will be no contested convention. Here’s why…

Bernie Sanders

Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders made news yesterday, when he asserted that next month’s Democratic National Convention would be “contested.” According to Sanders, neither he nor Hillary Clinton will have enough pledged delegates to secure the nomination — and since unpledged delegates (aka super-delegates) do not vote until the convention — the entire event will be “contested.”

That’s a lie.

To be fair, I don’t think Sanders lied intentionally, I just think he misunderstands what a contested convention actually is. The purpose of a political convention is to pick the leader (nominee) of said political party. Generally speaking, whoever receives a majority of all delegates gets the nomination. On the initial ballot, if any candidate gets a majority of all delegates, the process is over and the nominee is established. If no candidate gets a majority on the first ballot, then the convention is said to be “contested” — meaning that a candidate needs to build a coalition of delegates to reach a majority. Contested conventions are only likely when three or more candidates have a significant number of delegates.

Hillary Clinton will end the primary process with more popular votes, more pledged delegates, more super-delegates, and more states won. On the first ballot, all of her delegates will cast their vote for her. Because of this certain fact, there is zero chance that the convention will be contested.

Finally, there is another reason why we know the convention won’t be contested. Sanders and Clinton are the only two candidates with any delegates to the 2016 Democratic National Convention. With only two people on the ballot, it’s mathematically impossible that someone won’t get a majority on the first ballot. Think about it: The overall number of delegates is an odd number; so with only two options, someone will have a majority once all delegates vote.

Bernie Sanders has a lot great qualities, but math and logic aren’t among them.

Why does Bernie Sanders keep disrespecting President Obama?

SANDERS

As his “political revolution” rolls along, Sen. Bernie Sanders continues to disrespect President Obama. Unfortunately, this is not a new theme for the democratic socialist. Keep in mind, in 2011, Sanders revealed that he thought Obama should face a primary challenger prior to his re-election.

Just today, Politico ran an alarming story, “Bernie Sanders questions Obama’s leadership.” And on CNN, Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed pointed out how “dismissive” Sanders has been of the president’s record.

 

Time and time again, Sanders rails against the “Democratic establishment,” but it’s important to remember that the Democratic establishment currently controls the White House. And every time Sanders paints with his broad brush, he dismisses the accomplishments of the 44th president — a Democratic president.

The president’s accomplishments are too many to list: the Affordable Care Act, the rescuing of the automobile industry, the killing of Osama bin Laden, the immigration executive action, etc. And when you consider the level of Republican obstruction and racism that Obama has faced, the president’s successes are even more stunning.

Bernie Sanders never bothered to join the Democratic Party. He has never raised money for the Democratic Party. He has rarely even lifted a finger to help elect Democrats. And now, he dismisses President Obama’s achievements. Why would Democrats want such a person as its standard-bearer in 2016?

In Iowa, the Democratic primary is just another cash cow

Picking up on a point I made Monday, when Iowa Democrats complain that Hillary Clinton should face an early primary challenger, remember to explore their motives. Ed Kilgore, of Talking Points Memo, made an excellent observation this morning:

State Democratic officials also want a contested race because that boosts the party apparatus and fundraising. Mr. Obama’s 2008 campaign attracted scores of volunteers who remain active in the party. Various presidential hopefuls, moreover, serve as star attractions for fundraising dinners and barbecue cookouts across the state.

John Stone, party chairman in Cerro Gordo County, throws the annual Wing Ding supper in Clear Lake in August. When Mr. Obama spoke there in 2007, he drew nearly 700 people, with attendees paying $25 a ticket to benefit local candidates in 17 northern Iowa counties. Without a big name, the dinner draws closer to 400 people, Mr. Stone said.

There’s only one reason to enter a presidential primary: to win it! If some random Democrat is entering the field to influence Hillary Clinton or to raise money or to highlight some liberal cause — than it’s a misguided attempt. Moreover, it’s ridiculous to prop up a losing candidate simply to raise money for the state party. By definition, a national election is for the benefit of the national party. If a state party wants to raise money, than its gubernatorial nominee should lead that effort.